Mars Exchange
Expanding the Audience for Mars One: A Conversation with Nico Marquardt

Expanding the Audience for Mars One: A Conversation with Nico Marquardt

by Vince on Thursday, 15th December 2016 in Expert Opinions, People, Nico Marquardt

Nico Marquardt is an adviser to Mars One on matters involving social media, brand engagement, and marketing. Marquardt is currently the youngest member of the local parliament in Germany. He has created social media strategies for major election campaigns during the 2013 German federal elections and the state elections in 2014 and for corporations like American Express. He is CEO of the Rabbit Consulting Group, a global consulting firm that focuses on digital transformation and improving the management capacity of its clients. He is also a director at the German energy company EWP. This is an impressive resume for any person, but it’s fascinating to note that Marquardt is in his early twenties. All that said, space fanatics may know him even better as the boy who, in the year 2008 at age 13, wrote a research paper about the potential for a collision between a geosynchronous satellite and Asteroid 99942 Apophis, which in the year 2029 will pass only 31,300 kilometers over the Earth, much closer than the moon.

Earlier this year, I asked Marquardt about how he's helping Mars One. In this second of two parts, Marquardt discusses his involvement in Mars One and how marketing positively contributes to going to Mars. Also read part 1: Marketing Mars One: A Conversation with Nico Marquardt.

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Marketing Mars One: A Conversation with Nico Marquardt

Marketing Mars One: A Conversation with Nico Marquardt

by Vince on Wednesday, 2nd November 2016 in Expert Opinions, People, Nico Marquardt

Nico Marquardt is an adviser to Mars One on matters involving social media, brand engagement, and marketing. Marquardt is currently the youngest member of the local parliament in Germany. He has created social media strategies for major election campaigns during the 2013 German federal elections and the state elections in 2014 and for corporations like American Express. He is CEO of the Rabbit Consulting Group, a global consulting firm that focuses on digital transformation and improving the management capacity of its clients. He is also a director at the German energy company EWP. This is an impressive resume for any person, but it’s fascinating to note that Marquardt is in his early twenties. All that said, space fanatics may know him even better as the boy who, in the year 2008 at age 13, wrote a research paper about the potential for a collision between a geosynchronous satellite and Asteroid 99942 Apophis, which in the year 2029 will pass only 31,300 kilometers over the Earth, much closer than the moon.

Early this year, I asked Marquardt about how he became an adviser to the project and how he's helping Mars One. In this first of two parts, Marquardt discusses his involvement in Mars One and how marketing positively contributes to going to Mars.

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Planetary Protection: Preventing contamination of Mars

Planetary Protection: Preventing contamination of Mars

by Vince on Thursday, 8th September 2016 in Expert Opinions, People, John Rummel

Dr. John D. Rummel, an adviser to Mars One, is a Senior Scientist with the SETI Institute and was formerly the Director of East Carolina University’s (ECU’s) Institute for Coastal Science and Policy. He has served twice with NASA—from 1986 to 1993 as (among other things) Exobiology Program Manager and Manager, Life Support Systems Integration, and from 1998 to 2006 as NASA’s Planetary Protection Officer. From 2006 to 2008 he was NASA’s Senior Scientist for Astrobiology, responsible for all of NASA’s efforts in astrobiology. He chaired The International Council for Science’s Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) Panel on Planetary Protection from 1999 to 2014, and is also a member of COSPAR’s Panel on Exploration and the representative of the International Union of Biological Science on the COSPAR Council. He is the lead author of some of the newest guidelines on the exploration of Mars, “A New Analysis of Mars ‘‘Special Regions’’: Findings of the Second MEPAG Special Regions Science Analysis Group,” published in 2014 in Astrobiology.

Early this year, I spoke with Dr. Rummel about the concept of planetary protection and why we need to be especially careful as we explore and look to the possibility of settling Mars. In this final of three parts, we explore the risks of contamination and how the Mars One habitat can play a role in mitigating those risks.

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Planetary Protection: How would the discovery of Martian life impact Mars One?

Planetary Protection: How would the discovery of Martian life impact Mars One?

by Vince on Thursday, 4th August 2016 in Expert Opinions, People, John Rummel

Dr. John D. Rummel, an adviser to Mars One, is a Senior Scientist with the SETI Institute and was formerly the Director of East Carolina University’s (ECU’s) Institute for Coastal Science and Policy. He has served twice with NASA—from 1986 to 1993 as (among other things) Exobiology Program Manager and Manager, Life Support Systems Integration, and from 1998 to 2006 as NASA’s Planetary Protection Officer. From 2006 to 2008 he was NASA’s Senior Scientist for Astrobiology, responsible for all of NASA’s efforts in astrobiology. He chaired The International Council for Science’s Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) Panel on Planetary Protection from 1999 to 2014, and is also a member of COSPAR’s Panel on Exploration and the representative of the International Union of Biological Science on the COSPAR Council. He the lead author of some of the newest guidelines on the exploration of Mars, “A New Analysis of Mars ‘‘Special Regions’’: Findings of the Second MEPAG Special Regions Science Analysis Group,” published in 2014 in Astrobiology.

Early this year, I spoke with Dr. Rummel about the concept of planetary protection and why we need to be especially careful about contaminating Mars as we explore and look to the possibility of settling it. In this second of three parts, we explore the Martian environment and the likelihood of Martian life.

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